Press

A UWC team’s development of a programme which rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively tests HIV drug resistance is a top 10 finalist for the Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA). Widely recognised as the premier award for African innovation, the IPA has attracted 958 submissions from 46 African countries which have been considered for the 2016 prize.

The full article can be accessed here.

The full article can be accessed here.

09 May 2016, Gaborone, Botswana – The African Innovation Foundation (AIF) today announced the top 10 nominees for its landmark programme, the Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA). Now celebrating its 5th year under the theme “Made in Africa”, IPA is the premier innovation initiative in the African continent, offering a grand share prize of US$150 000 and incentives to spur growth and prosperity in Africa through home-grown solutions.

The full article can be accessed here.

An anti-malaria drug made from a local plant, a 25-minute test for malaria, an organic low-cost fertiliser, software to determine which ARV drugs will be most effective, imaging technology to dramatically improve breast cancer detection and solar-powered water heating are among the 10 finalists named for the 2016 Innovation Prize for Africa (IPA).

The full article can be accessed here.

A TEAM from UWC has created a world-class programme which will rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively test HIV drug resistance. The development of the programme, called Exatype, is in response to statistics which show that of the 3.1 million South Africans currently on ARV treatment, almost 10 percent do not respond adequately to the first-line drugs provided to them, the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) said.

The full article can be accessed here.

A group of scientists at the University of the Western Cape has developed a more affordable test for drug-resistance to antiretroviral therapy in people with HIV. Simon Travers, a researcher at the university’s South African National Bioinformatics Institute, said: ‘International best practice says that everyone should be tested prior to starting treatment. But this is not the case in South Africa.’ He said not testing resistance to therapy reduces chances of successful treatment but that routine testing ‘would be too expensive given current resistance testing approaches’.

The full article can be accessed here.

Health care is entering a new era of personalised medicine, where treatment is tailored to the individual patient. To usher in this era, researchers across the world are trying to create cheaper tests that can find DNA mutations in humans, bacteria and viruses. In South Africa, researchers are using these new, high-throughput testing methods to crack the problem of HIV drug resistance. Drug resistance testing is considered a critical part of an effective HIV treatment programme, but until now testing has been very costly. Now, novel research in South Africa has come up with a solution that cuts the cost up to tenfold, raising the possibility of an HIV drug resistance test that could be accessible to almost anyone.

The full article can be accessed here.